TOO LITTLE BLOOD IN THE BRONCO

BOB AUGUST:

    BLOOD IN THE BRONCO INVENTORY: You itemize seven locations in the Bronco where blood was found...

    1. Blood drop matching Simpson's found on driver's door interior and in two places
    on the instrument panel.
    2. Blood on the steering wheel matched a mixture of Simpson's and Nicole's.
    3. Blood on the center console matched Simpson's.
    4. More blood on the center console matched both Simpson's and Goldman's.
    5. Blood on the driver's side wall matched Simpson's.
    6. Blood on the carpet matched Nicole's.
    7. Several blood samples on the center console matched Simpson's, Ron's, andb_interrs.jpg (5275 bytes)
    Nicole's together.

    Your items (1), (3), and (5) are from Simpson only, and since he was bleeding on the night of the murder these show only that he was in the Bronco that night, not that he murdered anybody. Item (6) was described as in the shape of a left shoe, and it is presumed that is where Simpson stepped when he still had blood in the interstices of the shoe he wore. That suggests that he stepped in the blood pool, and tends to corroborate the fact that he left Bundy after the blood had started to flow. If you wish, it "proves" that Simpson was at the scene, but it does not prove that he killed anybody. Item's (4) and (7) on the center console are a mixture of Simpson's blood and that of the victims.

    In my understanding (based largely on the very distribution of blood we are discussing), Simpson carried the right hand glove away from the scene when it was still wet with blood (or at least tacky). And, because he carried it in his own left hand, he also bled onto the glove (near the "wrist notch," where a person would likely carry a blood soaked glove). So, when Simpson set the glove down to drive the Bronco (and set it in the most natural place -- the center console) the wet blood from the glove transferred to the console, and that contained contributions from Simpson and both victims (all of which were by then on the glove.) So, the center console stains do not indicate more than that Simpson removed the glove from the crime scene and transported it back to Rockingham on the center console of the Bronco.

    Finally, there is your item (2), a jot at the 7:00 o'clock position of the steering wheel which contained blood from Nicole and Simpson. Notice that the 7:00 o'clock position is where the left hand would contact the steering wheel in normal use. Previously I showed that the other stains in the Bronco could be accounted for if Simpson carried the glove away from the crime scene in his own bleeding left hand, and here we see that the same left hand -- which both had his own blood and had just contacted victim blood on the glove -- left those same stains on the steering wheel.

    So, there is no stain in the Bronco that is not accounted for by Simpson's after the fact visit in which he carried away the right hand murder glove in his own left hand and transported it to Rockingham on the center console of the Bronco. Nothing to indicate that he was involved in a ferocious and very bloody knife fight. And, the explanation is not convoluted. It is one seamless, natural action that results from the premise that Simpson did take the glove from Bundy to Rockingham.

   AMOUNT OF BLOOD: You say, "It is not the amount of liquid blood that means anything..." Wrong. Your inventory shows seven items, but the total quantity of VICTIMS' blood there is only about two drops, all of which are explained by an after-the-fact visit to Bundy. There is completely missing any blood that would indicate the ferocious action of killing two people with a knife.

    I have been doing a good deal of painting this year, and even though the objects of my attention are static (not moving, ducking, juking, twisting, bending, stooping, as knife victims do, according to Dr. Ceril Wecht), level, and at waist height, I still invariably get paint on me in the damnedest places -- particularly my hands and arms. Mere wiping will not serve to put me in a condition where it is safe to sit in a chair. I have to wash down thoroughly in a place where I can see what I am doing, and change out of the clothes I wore while I worked. I have had similar experiences with doing concrete and stucco work, and with gardening. Your belief that Simpson could have done this tremendously bloody murder and not carried away a single drop of blood that he transferred into the Bronco as a result of that activity is quite incredible, Bob, and is a window on your advanced state of self-delusion (or lack of the most rudimentary real world activities).

    (Incidentally, blood stains on upholstery can not be causally wiped away. Since no upholstery blood stains were found, we know that no blood from Simpson came onto the upholstery of the Bronco -- not a drop. It would be remarkable -- impossible, I think -- that a man could do these very messy murders and not get a single drop on his clothes, hands, or arms that would transfer to the upholstery while he drove.)


Dick Wagner • Van Nuys, CA (7/28/01) NG_724e


   NOTE: In a subsequent reply to Robert Risch on the AFOJS newsgroup, I offered this related observation...

   BLOOD DISTRIBUTION: The distribution of blood on Goldman's face and clothes implies that Goldman was in a particular posture when he did all of the bleeding from his neck wound. Of that you say, "Assuming that you are accurate... so what? Why is it inconstant with a Simpson guilty scenario?"

    Well, the blood distribution on Goldman shows that while he was being butchered he was seated straight legged, probably on the front walk just outside the gate, and nearly bent double (to understand the reason for knowing this, see our articles, "Blood on Goldman's Clothes" and "Goldman's Cause of Death."). The implied position for his assailant is squatting behind with his left hand covering Goldman's mouth, and his right hand wielding the knife between his own left arm and Goldman's left neck. In such a posture, Goldman's gushing jugular vein would have greatly stained the assailant's left upper arm and forearm, particularly the inside surfaces; some blood would also splatter onto the assailant's left side.

    Later, when Shively encountered Simpson, he was stopped in such a direction that when he put his head out the window and looked back at her he was turned more than 90 degrees in the seat of his car. See below for a transcript fragment, particularly the first three questions and answers. (For the geometry of the situation, see the illustration in our article, "Remembering Jill Shively".) This would have involved his turning his side against the back of the car seat, brushing his upper arm against the inside of the window frame, and putting his left forearm on the window sill. All of those surfaces would have been heavily stained with Goldman's blood if Simpson had done the crime in the way that the blood evidence says Goldman was butchered. Yet, we saw no such indication.

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From Grand Jury transcript of June 21, 1994. Shively describes to Clark her encounter with Simpson...

    Q. WAS THE DRIVER'S SIDE WINDOW OF THE BRONCO OPENED OR CLOSED?
    A. IT WAS OPENED.
    Q. WERE YOU ABLE TO SEE THE PERSON SEATED IN THE BRONCO?
    A. YES, I WAS.
    Q. AND HOW WERE YOU ABLE TO SEE HIM?
    A. HE TURNED AROUND AND GLARED AT ME AFTER HE HAD ALMOST HIT ME, AND THEN I -THEN HE STARTED YELLING AT THE GUY IN THE NISSAN TO MOVE HIS CAR.
    Q. SO WHEN YOU SAY HE TURNED AROUND AND GLARED AT YOU, DID YOU ACTUALLY MAKE EYE CONTACT WITH HIM?
    A. YES, I DID.
    Q. DID HE SAY ANYTHING?
    A. NO. HE JUST GAVE ME A REAL QUICK LOOK, LIKE WHAT WAS I -- YOU KNOW, IT LOOKED LIKE HE WAS MAD OR ANGRY AND LIKE WHAT WAS I DOING TO HIM OR SOMETHING. I FELT LIKE HE WAS LOOKING AT ME LIKE I HAD ALMOST HIT HIM OR SOMETHING.
    Q. DID HE SAY ANYTHING TO THE DRIVER OF THE NISSAN?
    A. HE KEPT TELLING HIM, "GET OUT OF THE WAY; GET OUT OF THE WAY. MOVE THE CAR; MOVE. GET OUT OF THE WAY." AND THEN THE MORE HE YELLED, THE DRIVER OF THE NISSAN, THE GUY IN THE NISSAN GOT UPSET AND HE WAS TRYING TO GET HIS CAR OUT OF THE WAY. BUT THEY WERE BOTH RUNNING INTO EACH OTHER EACH WAY THEY WENT.
    Q. DID THE DRIVER OF THE BRONCO EVER PUT HIS HEAD OUT THE WINDOW OR ANY PART OF HIS BODY OUT THE DRIVER'S SIDE WINDOW?
    A. HE STUCK HIS HAND AND LEANED OUT TO YELL AT THE GUY.
    Q. CAN YOU SHOW US WHAT THAT IS.
    A. HE WENT LIKE THIS, "MOVE; GET OUT OF THE WAY; MOVE," LIKE THAT.
    MS. CLARK: THE WITNESS HAS LEANED HER UPPER TORSO TO THE LEFT AND EXTENDED HER ARMS OUT AND HER HEAD OUT WHILE LEANING SIDEWAYS.
    Q. DID THE NISSAN DRIVER SAY ANYTHING TO RESPONSE?
    A. HE LOOKED SCARED. HE LOOKED ANGRY AT FIRST, BUT THEN HE LOOKED SCARED, BECAUSE SOMEONE -- HE WAS LIKE A MANIAC, SOMEONE GONE CRAZY OR SOMETHING.
    Q. NO; WAIT. NO; NO. DON'T SPECULATE WHAT THE NISSAN DRIVER WAS THINKING.
    A. OKAY. HE LOOKED SCARED AT FIRST, OR ANGRY, AND THEN HE LOOKED SCARED.
    Q. NOW, DID THAT YELLING OCCUR BEFORE OR AFTER YOU MADE EYE CONTACT WITH HIM?
    A. AFTER.
    Q. SO FIRST HE LOOKED AT YOU --
    A. HE GLANCED BACK AT ME AND I COULD SEE HIM FULL-FACE DIAGONALLY. THEN HE WAS YELLING AT THE DRIVER LIKE HE WAS IN A HURRY TO GET OUT OF THE SITUATION HE WAS NOW IN.

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